How to host a Good Onya Mate party at home next Saturday

Rural Aid’s annual fundraising concert is a week away, so Australians are being encouraged to host a Good Onya Mate gathering complete with farm inspired games, food, and fancy dress. 

CEO of Rural Aid, John Warlters said no matter where they live, Australians can help Rural Aid raise much-needed funds for Aussie farming families coping with the effects of Australia’s record-breaking drought and recent bushfires by hosting a Celebrate Good Onya Mate party. 

“It’s easy to get started – just borrow some of our ideas, gather your friends, family, and neighbours together, and tune into Channel 9 from 7.30pm on 28 November,” Mr Warlters said.

The organisation invites everyone to don a big hat, boots and a belt buckle on the night, using the hashtag #CelebrateGoodOnyaMate to have posts featured on Rural Aid’s live social media gallery. 

Farm-themed snacks including cow pat brownies and piggies in a blanket are ideal menu items. Recipes can be found at goodonyamate.org.au/celebrate/

The spotify playlist helps prepare for the concert line-up. 

“We encourage all party hosts to do an ‘Akubra pass-around’ for donations. Just $20 is enough to buy a bale of hay for a farmer’s livestock that are struggling to survive the drought.”

 The website goodonyamate.org.au/celebrate/ includes games such as concert bingo and a Jimmy Barnes quiz, decorations and donation links.

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Rural Aid’s unofficial spokesperson, The Ringer, advises Australians on how to dress like a farmer.

One of Australia’s largest rural charities, Rural Aid, is asking all Australians to dress like a farmer for the national “Good Onya Mate” fundraising concert scheduled for 28 November.

Rural Aid’s unofficial spokesperson for the event, known as The Ringer, held a press conference today to advise Australians on appropriate headwear for the event.

The Ringer helps Australians dress like a farmer for the Good Onya Mate concert.

“You want to make sure you’re not wearing your country hat awkwardly like a city politician on a farm visit,” The Ringer says from his paddock in central Queensland.

“Brim size is all important, and don’t go putting a feather in your cap – no one in the bush will take you seriously.” 

The charity encourages Australians to post a photo of their outfits with the hashtag #goodonyamate as a message of solidarity to farmers across the country.

“While I’ve got your attention. Let me blow your mind with a few stats. In the last financial year Rural Aid provided more than $28 million in financial assistance to almost 5,000 farmers, including more than 20,000 pre-paid gift cards. We travelled across rural Australia to ensure more than $11 million in fodder and hay totalling over 50,000-plus large bales, almost 3,000 water deliveries  valued at more than $1 million were delivered and some 1,300 farmer counselling sessions were provided.”
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Official spokesperson, CEO John Warlters 0409618641
Unofficial spokesperson, The Ringer 0407652149
Media contact, Lyndsey Douglas 0424203935 media@admin.media.ruralaid.org.au

Rural Aid’s unofficial spokesperson, The Ringer, advises Australians on how to dress like a farmer.

One of Australia’s largest rural charities, Rural Aid, is asking all Australians to dress like a farmer for the national “Good Onya Mate” fundraising concert scheduled for 28 November.

Rural Aid’s unofficial spokesperson for the event, known as The Ringer, held a press conference today to advise Australians on appropriate footwear for the event.

“If you’re going to get involved in this bloody spectacular event in a few weeks, you’ll need to put your best boot forward,” The Ringer says from his paddock in central Queensland.

“The trusty RM William is suitable for those dressing as well-heeled wool growers down south, gumboots are fine for dairy farmers, the square-toed boot is best for cattle producers… but I must reiterate, ugg boots are a no go.” 

The charity encourages Australians to post a photo of their outfits with the hashtag #goodonyamate as a message of solidarity to farmers across the country.

The nationally broadcast concert is set to be a star-studded event with local and international stars banding together to say Good Onya Mate to our farmers who have survived through drought, bushfire, flood and covid this year. 

Rural Aid  has more than 14,000 farmers registered for assistance and receives new registrations daily. Rural Aid has distributed over $28 million in aid in the last year. Rural Aid is known as a rapid responder in the face of natural disaster, supporting our farmers from emergency to recovery. 

“Rural Aid is building stronger futures for farmers, their families and the communities they call home,” The Ringer concluded

To help Australians authentically dress like a farmer, Rural Aid has appointed The Ringer from Queensland to explain how it’s done. He held a press conference today on appropriate footwear.
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Official spokesperson, CEO John Warlters 0409618641
Unofficial spokesperson, The Ringer 0407652149
Media contact, Lyndsey Douglas 0424203935 media@admin.media.ruralaid.org.au

One of Australia’s largest rural charities, Rural Aid, is asking all Australians to get ready to host a “Good Onya Mate” gathering on 28 November as a message of solidarity to farmers across the country.

On this day, Nine will broadcast the Good Onya Mate fundraising concert – featuring a star-studded line up of local and international artists and heart-wrenching stories from farmers that Rural Aid has supported through drought, bushfire, food and COVID-19 this year.

CEO of Rural Aid, John Warlters, said that while Rural Aid can’t reveal the musicians and celebrities involved yet, Nine has promised a night of toe-tapping fun and stories of farmers who have benefited from Rural Aid’s assistance.

“The concert will raise funds to help farmers transition from emergency aid to recovery, to protect Australia’s food supply chain,” Mr Warlters said.

“Through all the difficulties 2020 threw at rural Australia, the farming sector has continued to ensure all Australian families have the range and quality of food we expect.”

The team at Rural Aid are encouraging families, friends and venues to host their own covid-safe socially-distanced celebrations during the concert.

“Whilst we can’t head to a crowded concert in 2020, we want Aussies to create their own covid-safe concert environment.”

“You could host a Good Onya Mate main street dinner in your rural town, a street or house party, or attend a pub or restaurant event if you’re in a city. And while you’re at it, why not get in the spirit and dress like a farmer.” – John Warlters, CEO of Rural Aid.

To help Australians authentically dress like a farmer, Rural Aid has appointed The Ringer from Queensland to explain how it’s done. He held a press conference earlier today. 

The Ringer helps Australians prepare for the Good Onya Mate concert, 28 November 2020.

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Official spokesperson, CEO John Warlters 0409618641
Unofficial spokesperson, The Ringer 0407652149
Media contact, Lyndsey Douglas 0424203935 media@admin.media.ruralaid.org.au

Rural Aid says this is one of the most important days on the calendar. 

With National Agriculture and Related industries Day less than a week away, Rural Aid is inviting residents  of the South Burnett region in Queensland to don their Akubras, pop on some boots, bring their umbrellas,  some dinner and covid masks and head to Kingaroy on Saturday, November 21 to celebrate our farmers  and their importance. 

Made possible by Hancock Agriculture and S. Kidman & Co, the event at the famous Bethany Farm, 218  Peterson’s Drive, Coolabunia – near Kingaroy – features great musical acts and has no entrance fee. 

National Agriculture & Related Industries Day founder and patron Gina Rinehart said: “Where would our  country be without our farmers, pastoralists, fishermen, market gardeners, fruit, flowers and timber  providers, viticulturalists, pearlers, poultry and beekeepers, in short, without our agriculture?” 

The event starts at 6.15pm and is a celebration of the importance of agriculture in Australia. 

“Agriculture is Australia’s second largest export earner with $1 out of every $7 export dollars coming from farm produce…” Mrs Rinehart said. 

A bar will be available with part proceeds going to Rural Aid initiatives including its disaster assistance and  Stronger Futures programs. There is a limit of 500 people, so registrations are essential via www.nationalagricultureandrelatedindustriesday.com.au/kingaroy-registration 

Queensland country music star Mick Lindsay and bush ballad singer-songwriter Dean Perrett will have attendees dancing and toe-tapping throughout the night. A video recording dedicated to the event from  Queensland Ballet will also be shown. 

Rural Aid CEO John Warlters said National Agriculture & Related Industries Day was one of the most important events on the national calendar. 

“We’ll be paying tribute to the men and women who produce our food and fibre, especially given the unprecedented circumstances that have prevailed this year,” Mr Warlters said. 

“We are indeed the lucky country, when despite everything that has been thrown at farming families – drought, bushfires, floods and COVID-19, we continue to have access to world class produce – fruit,  vegetables and protein.”. 

Mr Warlters recognised the Kingaroy area was an epicentre for quality produce and a fitting location in which to celebrate all the good things about agriculture. 

“Rural Aid has been active in supporting producers throughout the South and North Burnett. It is fantastic  to see the region at the heart of National Agriculture & Related Industries Day celebrations.”

NOTE: This is a covid safe event. If you are experiencing symptoms please do  not attend. “We are all in this together”. 
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Media enquiries: Lyndsey Douglas 0424203935 media@admin.media.ruralaid.org.au  Media spokespersons: Rural Aid CEO John Warlters – 0409 618 641